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Podiatry

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Overview

Podiatrists are uniquely qualified among medical professionals to treat the foot and ankle based on their education, training, and experience. Miracle Mile Medical Center’s medical staff includes highly skilled podiatric surgeons.

Bone Spurs - A bone spur (osteophyte) is a bony growth formed on normal bone. It’s usually smooth, but it can cause wear and tear or pain if it presses or rubs on other bones or soft tissues such as ligaments, tendons, or nerves in the body. Common places for bone spurs include the spine, shoulders, hands, hips, knees, and feet. Bone spurs can be surgically removed or treated as part of a surgery to repair or replace a joint when osteoarthritis has caused considerable damage and deformity such as the repair of a bunion or heel spur in the foot.

Bunions - A bunion is a bony bump on the joint at the base of the big toe. As the bump gets bigger, it causes the big toe to turn in toward the second toe. The tissues around the joint may be swollen and tender. A bony bump at the base of the little toe is called a bunionette or tailor’s bunion. The little toe also bends inward and the joint swells or enlarges. If nonsurgical treatment has not relieved toe pain and you aren't able to do normal daily activities, or if you have a severe bunion, you may want to consider surgical treatment. Bunion surgery is done to help restore normal alignment to the toe joint and relieve pain. There are different types of bunion surgery – the best type of surgery for you depends on how severe your bunion is and how experienced your surgeon is. Look for a surgeon who does many different types of bunion surgery on a regular basis. Each bunion is different, and surgery needs to be tailored to each case.

Fallen Arches – Treatment for flat feet and fallen arches depends on the severity and cause of the problem. If flat feet cause no pain or other difficulties, then treatment is probably not needed. If pain or foot damage is severe, your doctor may recommend surgery. Procedures may include the following:

  • Fusing foot or ankle bones together (arthrodesis)
  • Removing bone spurs
  • Cutting or changing the shape of the bone (osteotomy)
  • Cleaning the tendons’ protective coverings (synovectomy)
  • Adding tendon from other parts of your body to tendons in your foot to help balance the "pull" of the tendons and form an arch (tendon transfer)
  • Grafting bone to your foot to make the arch rise more naturally (lateral column lengthening)

Diabetes- Related Foot Problems – Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet:

Diabetic neuropathy. Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold, or pain. This lack of feeling is called “sensory diabetic neuropathy.” If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. The muscles of the foot may not function properly because the nerves that make the muscles work are damaged. This could cause the foot to not align properly and create too much pressure in one area of the foot. It is estimated that up to 10% of people with diabetes will develop foot ulcers. Foot ulcers occur because of nerve damage and peripheral vascular disease.

Peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called “peripheral vascular disease.” Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart. If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing ulcers or gangrene (the death of tissue due to a lack of blood).

Procedures

Our Physicians

   

In Depth Data:

Bunionectomy

A bunion (hallux valgus) is an enlargement of the bone or tissue around a joint at the base of the big toe or at the base of the little toe. Bunions often occur when the joint is stressed over a prolonged period, often from chronic irritation and pressure from poorly fitted shoes. Bunions may be inherited as a family trait. Bunions may also result from arthritis, which often affects the big toe joint. Correction of a bunion can be performed in several ways. The type of surgical procedure performed depends upon the severity of the bunion, the individual s age, general health, activity level, and the condition of the bones and connective tissue. The main approach is to make an incision between the great toe and the second toe, remove the involved tissue or bony eminence, and restore the toe s correct position. A bunion can be removed and great toe alignment restored using K-wire or cortex screws. Osteotomy is another method and involves removal of abnormal bone tissue that is causing malposition of the great toe. Once the surgery is complete, the incision is closed with sutures and dressings are applied. Most bunion surgery is performed under ankle block anesthesia in which the patient is awake but their foot is numb. Occasionally, general or spinal anesthesia is used. Patients should consult their surgeon for a complete explanation of the procedure and its associated risks and complications.

Correction of Hammertoe

Hammer toe is a condition in which the toe develops a claw-like appearance. This condition is generally found in the second toe but it can affect all the toes with the exception of the great toe. To correct the problem, the physician makes an incision over the toe close to the foot. A portion of the extensor tendon and joint capsule under the skin is removed. The supporting ligaments are cut to allow the toe to stretch out to 90 degrees. Once the toe is straightened, the head and neck of the proximal toe is removed and smoothed. The incisions are sutured and the dressing is applied. Most hammer toe surgery is performed under ankle block anesthesia in which the patient is awake but their foot is numb. Occasionally, general or spinal anesthesia is used. Patients should consult their surgeon for a complete explanation of the procedure and its associated risks

Excision of Neuroma

Neuroma is a condition that affects the nerves in the foot. It produces throbbing and stabbing pain in the area of the nerve branches. This is corrected through a surgical out-patient procedure. The physician makes an incision on the top of the foot between the 3rd and 4th toes. The neuroma is located and the fibrous nerve is removed. Precautions are taken to prevent re-growth. The incision is sutured and a dressing is applied. Most neuroma surgery is performed under ankle block anesthesia in which the patient is awake but their foot is numb. Occasionally, general or spinal anesthesia is used. Patients should consult their surgeon for a complete explanation of the procedure and its associated risks and complications.

Plantar Fasciotomy

Plantar Fasciitis is the most common cause of localized heel pain. It is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a ligament structure that supports the long arch of the foot. The plantar fascia is a tough, fibrous band of connective tissue that runs from the heel bone to the ball of the foot. Plantar fasciitis starts as dull, intermittent pain in the heel or arch and progresses to a sharp, persistent pain. The pain usually occurs in the morning or after resting and gradually disappears with walking. Symptoms may also include tightness in the calf muscle. Although it may occur spontaneously, plantar fasciitis is generally caused by repetitive strain, increased activity, athletic activity, running on uneven surfaces, running on heels or balls of feet, flat feet, high arched rigid feet, poor supporting shoes, large sudden weight gain, aging, and/or family history. When conservative management does not work, a surgical procedure called plantar fasciotomy can correct this problem. The physician makes an incision across the long axis of the heel. The affected area is removed or freed from any inflammation inside the tissues. The incision is sutured, dressed and a walking boot is applied. Most plantar fasciotomy surgery is performed under ankle block anesthesia in which the patient is awake but their foot is numb. Occasionally, general or spinal anesthesia is used. Patients should consult their surgeon for a complete explanation of the procedure and its associated risks and complications.

 
 
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